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 FIRE MUSIC GLOBAL - © 2008 - 2019 All Rights Reserved  

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GILLIE vs WAYNE

Who doesn’t like a good ol’ fashioned rap beef?

Since Kool Herc’s first party in the South Bronx one summer day in August of 1973, feuds between MCs and crews have come and gone throughout hip-hop’s history. there’s really no shortage of a lyrical sparring match you can revisit and reminisce on. Even today, there’s some bad blood between rappers that’s just won’t go away. as part of our EDITORIALS fmg will be giving you some perspective on our series THE ART OF RAP BEEFS. ENJOY!!!

 

                                                                                                    

 

 

Year: 2006

 

Gillie da Kid was a former Cash Money Records artist who had an issue with the label’s top brass — Brian “Baby” Williams and Ronald “Slim” Williams — over money and publishing. The Philadelphia rapper claimed as a signee he was a ghostwriter for other Cash Money artists, including Stunna and their biggest superstar Lil Wayne. Baby also saw Gillie’s star power, and paired him with Wayne to be his mentor. According to Gillie, he says he wrote on Tha Carter, but claims he wasn’t in the sessions for Tha Carter II.

Gillie was supposed to have a solo record under Cash Money, but once that never materialized, he was sidelined as a behind-the-scenes artist penning songs for other people. Gillie realized that the situation wasn’t a good fit for him and left Cash Money and maintained his relationship with Wayne.

Likely out of loyalty to Birdman, Weezy struck first with a diss on “Problem Solver,” rapping, “Gillie man, I don’t think you ni—as should really fuck with me/The gun off me urgently workin’ and twerkin’ it perfectly.” This didn’t sit well with Gillie and he would appear on various street DVDs talking smack about Cash Money. It wasn’t long until Gillie responded to the diss with a freestyle over “Cannon” going at Weezy, Birdman, and Slim.

Their feud continued with more disses; Wayne’s Da Drought 3 had lines about Gillie on “Live From 504” and “Blooded.” In response, Gillie dropped the personal “Frontin’ Like Ya Daddy” over the “Stuntin’ Like My Daddy” instrumental. After a while, the beef died down a bit and seemed to come to an end when Gillie saluted Wayne (who was locked up in Riker’s Island at the time) in a ForbezDVD interview. “Hold ya head, ni–a. Real ni–a shit. Shout out to Wayne. You in there where it’s real. You on the other side. I feel you with both hands and feet. Hold ya head, ni–a,” he said.

Gillie’s show of respect was a little too late. Weezy fans already written him off as a fraud and a liar for even thinking anyone could write lyrics for the Best Rapper Alive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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